In situ optical and biogeochemical in- and above-water measurements are critical for calibration and validation of satellite ocean colour radiometry data products, and for refinement of ocean colour algorithms. During the SeaWiFS era, NASA commissioned the development of a series of ocean optical measurement protocols (see NASA Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation) which have served as international reference standards ever since, and have promoted the collection and assembly of climate quality, ocean optical datasets by the global ocean colour community. Since publication of the last revision in 2004, there have been major advances in instrumentation and observing capability, so these community-vetted protocols are being revised to account for new, emerging, and planned capabilities and modes of deployment.

Over the past few years NASA has sponsored several international workshops with experts (including breakout workshops at the International Ocean Colour Science meetings), to update and develop new community consensus protocols for ocean colour sensor validation. The newly drafted protocols will be made available to the international user community on this webpage for a period of time for testing, public comment and review, before they are accepted as international reference standards. Once accepted, the protocols will receive a publication date and version number (e.g., v1.0), and will also have a digital object identifier (doi) provided by OceanBestPractices. These revised protocols will be revisited periodically to determine if enough changes have taken place to warrant a significant update, in which case a new version number will be assigned.

IOCCG Ocean Optics & Biogeochemistry Protocols for Satellite Ocean Colour Sensor Validation

Volume 1.0 - Inherent Optical Property Measurements and Protocols: Absorption Coefficient (November 2018)

Correct citation for this volume:

IOCCG Protocol Series (2018). Inherent Optical Property Measurements and Protocols: Absorption Coefficient, Neeley, A. R. and Mannino, A. (eds.), IOCCG Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry Protocols for Satellite Ocean Colour Sensor Validation, Volume 1.0, IOCCG, Dartmouth, NS, Canada. http://dx.doi.org/10.25607/OBP-119

Download file: Inherent Optical Property Measurements and Protocols:  Absorption Coefficient (v1.0, November 2018)

Abstract

Inherent Optical Properties Measurements and Protocols: Absorption Coefficient (v1.0) is a document that serves as a comprehensive overview of calibration, measurement and analysis protocols for the state-of-the-art technologies that measure the absorption of particles in the water or on a filter pad. Chapter 1 provides a detailed overview of the absorption coefficient of pure water, colored dissolved matter and particles along with the current state-of-the-art pure water absorption coefficients, uncertainties and temperature and salinity corrections.  Chapters 2–4 provide detailed protocols for measuring particles in suspension using the reflective tube absorption meter, the integrating cavity absorption meter, and the point-source integrating cavity absorption meter. Lastly, Chapter 5 describes the most up-to-date methods for the measurement of absorbance and the computation of absorption for particles on a filter pad using the transmittance method, transmittance method with fiber optics, the transmittance-reflectance method and inside an integrating sphere. Chapters 1, 2, and 5 represent updated versions of those found in Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation Revision 4, Volume IV (Mitchell et al. 2002). Chapters 3 and 4 are new contributions to the protocol.

Volume 2.0 - Beam Transmission and Attenuation Coefficients: Instruments, Characterization, Field Measurements and Data Analysis Protocols (April 2019)

Correct citation for this volume:

IOCCG Protocol Series (2019). Beam Transmission and Attenuation Coefficients: Instruments, Characterization, Field Measurements and Data Analysis Protocols. Boss, E., Twardowski, M., McKee, D., Cetinić, I. and Slade, W. IOCCG Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry Protocols for Satellite Ocean Colour Sensor Validation, Volume 2.0, edited by A. Neeley and I. Cetinić, IOCCG, Dartmouth, NS, Canada. http://dx.doi.org/10.25607/OBP-458

Download File: Beam Transmission and Attenuation Coefficients: Instruments, Characterization, Field Measurements and Data Analysis Protocols.

Abstract

Inherent Optical Properties Measurements and Protocols: Beam Transmission and Attenuation (v2.0) is a document that serves as a comprehensive overview of beam transmittance concepts and the calibration, measurement and analysis protocols for the state-of-the-art technologies that measure the attenuation of dissolved and particulate matter in water. Section 1 provides a detailed overview of measurement concepts and governing equations to derive the beam attenuation coefficient. Section 2 details the design characteristics of common transmissometers. Section 3 describes methods for the characterization and calibration of beam transmissometers. Lastly, this document provides detailed data collection and analysis methods in Sections 4 and 5. This protocol document serves as an updated version of Chapter 2 in Ocean Optics Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Sensor Validation Revision 4, Volume IV (Pegau et al. 2003).

Volume 3.0 - Protocols for Satellite Ocean Color Data Validation: In situ Optical Radiometry (December 2019)

Correct citation for this volume:

IOCCG Protocol Series (2019). Protocols for Satellite Ocean Colour Data Validation: In Situ Optical Radiometry. Zibordi, G., Voss, K. J., Johnson, B. C. and Mueller, J. L. IOCCG Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry Protocols for Satellite Ocean Colour Sensor Validation, Volume 3.0, IOCCG, Dartmouth, NS, Canada.

Download File: Protocols for Satellite Ocean Colour Data Validation: In Situ Optical Radiometry

Abstract

This protocol document  aims to support the ocean color community with protocols for the collection, processing and quality assurance of in situ measurements of the apparent optical properties of natural water for the validation of satellite radiometric products. In addition to a general introduction on Elements of Marine Optical Radiometry Data and Analysis (Chapter 1), the document addresses Radiometers Specifications (Chapter 2), Calibration and Characterization of Optical Radiometers (Chapter 3), In-water Radiometry Measurements and Data Analysis (Chapter 4), and Above-water Radiometry Measurements and Data Analysis (Chapter 5).

The overall structure and content of the various chapters are based on, and benefit from, the Ocean Optics Protocols promoted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration within the framework of the Sea-Viewing Wide Field-of-View Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Sensor Intercomparison for Marine Biological and Interdisciplinary Ocean Studies (SIMBIOS) programs (Mueller and Austin 1995, Mueller et al. 2003a, Mueller et al. 2003b).

It is emphasized that, by recognizing optical radiometry can be heavily affected by the presence of clouds which will unavoidably challenge the quantification of measurement uncertainties, the protocols put emphasis only on measurements performed during clear sky conditions, which are those relevant for the validation of satellite ocean color data products.

Finally, it is anticipated that the chapters on in-water and above-water radiometry provide comprehensive details on those measurement methods sharing large consensus inside the community and whose application is strongly encouraged. Conversely, brief summaries are only provided for those methods already well represented by the previous ones or for those methods that may exhibit difficult implementation in a variety of measurement conditions.

Volume 4.0 - Inherent Optical Property Measurements and Protocols: Best Practices for the Collection and Processing of Ship-Based Underway Flow-Through Optical Data (November 2019)

Correct citation for this volume:

IOCCG Protocol Series (2019). Inherent Optical Property Measurements and Protocols: Best Practices for the Collection and Processing of Ship-Based Underway Flow-Through Optical Data. Boss, E., Haëntjens, N., Ackleson, S., Balch, B., Chase, A., Dall’Olmo, G., Freeman, S., Liu, Y., Loftin, J., Neary, W., Nelson, N., Novak, M., Slade, W., Proctor, C., Tortell, P., and Westberry. T. IOCCG Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry Protocols for Satellite Ocean Colour Sensor Validation, Volume 4.0, edited by A. R. Neeley and A. Mannino, IOCCG, Dartmouth, NS, Canada.

Download file: Inherent Optical Property Measurements and Protocols: Best Practices for the Collection and Processing of Ship-Based Underway Flow-Through Optical Data (v4.0, November 2019)

Abstract

Optical data can be collected using the flow-through systems installed on research vessels and ships of opportunity to take advantage of the availability of sea water pumped into the vessel. These “in-line”  or “underway” systems are able to provide data at spatial resolutions on the order of 10-100 m. As the number of research groups making these measurements grows, there is a need to provide coordinated data collection and processing protocols to standardize methodology and data quality. In 2015, a NASA-sponsored workshop was organized to share such knowledge. Here, we discuss the essential issues associated with in-line data collection, provide recommendations on best practices for collection and processing and report on available software.

Volume 5.0: Measurement Protocol of Absorption by Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) and Other Dissolved Materials (DRAFT - open for community feedback until 22 Dec 2019)

A draft version of the protocol entitled “Measurement Protocol of Absorption by Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) and Other Dissolved Materials“, is now available for community feedback for a period of ~60 days, with a closing deadline for comments of 22 December  2019.  We welcome your comments on this protocol document – please send to the following e-mail address before the deadline:  cdom_comments@oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov

Summary: Measuring light absorption by CDOM in situ is necessary for developing and validating current and future ocean color algorithms.  A CDOM Working Group has revised this section of the NASA ocean optics protocols (Mitchell et al. 2003) under the auspices of the IOCCG to reflect the development of new instrumentation and a greater understanding of the importance of CDOM and its distribution in coastal and open ocean waters over the past twenty years.  Our goal here is to describe a set of procedures that will be adhered to by the scientific community for making CDOM absorption measurements that can be integrated into bio-optical databases, specifically of sufficient quality to develop and validate ocean color algorithms/products and contribute to CDOM science.  Please provide comments on this protocol document  to the following e-mail address by December 22, 2019cdom_comments@oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov

Download Protocol: Measurement Protocol of Absorption by Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM) and Other Dissolved Materials

Volume 6.0: Particulate Organic Carbon Sampling and Measurement Protocols: Consensus Towards Future Ocean Color Missions (DRAFT - open for community feedback until 20 Jan 2020)

A draft version of the protocol entitled “Particulate Organic Carbon Sampling and Measurement Protocols: Consensus Towards Future Ocean Color Missions“, is now available for community feedback for a period of ~60 days, with a closing deadline for comments of 20 January 2020.  We welcome your comments on this protocol document – please send to the following e-mail address before the deadline:  poc_comments@oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov

Summary: This document is the product of a three-year effort that started with a two-and-a-half-day workshop organized by the NASA Ocean Ecology Lab Field Support Group and hosted at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center in Nov. 30- Dec 2, 2016. The objective was to produce community consensus protocols, for sample collection, filtration, storage, analysis, and quality assurance for marine particulate organic carbon appropriate for satellite algorithm development and validation. The hope is that the protocols presented here can be widely adopted by the academic scientific community engaged in ocean C and N cycle research, particularly those in activities that support ocean color validation The resulting protocol review document: Particulate Organic Carbon Sampling and Measurement Protocols: Consensus Towards Future Ocean Color Missions, and the associated workshop activity were sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) including funding for the Field Support Group (NASA Ocean Biology and Biogeochemistry Program) and a ROSES grant to Antonio Mannino, Ivona Cetinić, Joaquín Chaves, Michael Novak, and Jeremy Werdell under NASA Program Topical Workshops, Symposia, and Conferences with additional support for contributing authors and workshop participants by their respective institutions (see section 8 for complete list of participants’ affiliations). This document provides a detailed discussion of the state-of-the-art technologies and protocols for the sampling and measurement of marine particulate organic carbon. Important contributions by all the authors made the completion of this document possiblePlease provide comments on this protocol document  to the following e-mail address by 20 January 2020: poc_comments@oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov

Download Protocol: Particulate Organic Carbon Sampling and Measurement Protocols: Consensus Towards Future Ocean Color Missions

Noteworthy and Supplemental Topics on Ocean Colour Radiometry Protocols (DRAFT)

This volume entitled  “Noteworthy and Supplemental Topics on Ocean Colour Radiometry Protocols“will contain a series of chapters on practical  protocols, including measurements on sub-optimal conditions. New chapters will be added periodically, and will explain how to deploy radiometers and process data under various sky and sea states, and in a wide range of water types and bathymetry, including state-of-the-art techniques and instruments.

The first chapter in this volume is the “Skylight-Blocked Approach and Data Processing Scheme” which directly measures Lw for the calculation of remote sensing reflectance (Rrs). Public comment and review for this chapter is now closed.  The chapter is  currently under review by the Editorial Review Board.

Download Chapter: On-Water Radiometry Measurements: Skylight-Blocked Approach and Data Processing (Draft)

Start typing and press Enter to search